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Corner Tree

Posted by
Barbara Lee (Oakland, United States) on 8 October 2010 in Abstract & Conceptual and Portfolio.

Hey, I know this is not the most "sexy" portfolio, but I am continuing to have fun with it. My friend and amazing photographer Don Smith said it well, I think, in a comment on yesterday's image when he said that it is important for all serious photographers to engage in study of form, line, texture, and pattern. I think it is sort of like practicing your scales when you play piano. Hey, that is what I am doing here! Playing my scales!

NIKON D90 1/100 second F/14.0 ISO 250 135 mm (35mm equiv.)

To view more of my images, visit my portfolio at Barbara Lee Photography. Also, visit my Facebook fan page at http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/pages/Barbara-Lee-Photography/244133283497[/url

Spotlight photo at http://barbaralee.aminus3.com/image/2010-10-09.html

marci from somewhere in..., Morocco

wonderful advice, to be sure!

8 Oct 2010 7:50am

Judy aka L@dybug from Brooksville, Florida, United States

Your "scales" are very harmonious ... I like this image very much.

8 Oct 2010 12:57pm

john4jack from Corvallis, Oregon, United States

terrific

8 Oct 2010 9:19pm

Denny Jump Photo from Easton, PA, United States

Oh I had to look at yesterday's we have been in and out (speaking of In-n-Out I sure miss them!! But I really lke this one today Barbara! To me, I think it is the added "corner" in the structure and it is giving rest to the nature form of the tree...I took a ton of shots downtown when were were at David and Lyndsy's a few months ago...you have inspired me to go back and see what I got..I love this one here Barbara!!

9 Oct 2010 12:07am

DarkElf from Perth, Australia

really great vision here - not only the texture of the building corner but to use the tree shadow so well in the composition! the wall acts almost like a mirror here - superb capture!

9 Oct 2010 12:17am

NIKON D90
1/100 second
F/14.0
ISO 250
135 mm (35mm equiv.)

shadow
tree
building